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behaviourism – coolinarism
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behaviourism

behaviourism

Classical behaviourism, prevalent in the first third of the 20th century, was concerned exclusively with measurable and observable data and excluded ideas, emotions.

In behaviourism, the organism is seen as responding to conditions – stimuli set by the outer environment and by inner biological processes,

Classical behaviourism was further characterized by a strict determinism based on the belief that every response is elicited by a specific stimulus,

In behaviorism and related stimulus–response theories, a stimulus constitutes the basis for behavior. A distinction is made between the distal or external stimulus and the proximal stimulus the stimulation of sensory organs. An internal stimulus is often the first component of a homeostatic control system. External stimuli are capable of producing systemic responses throughout the body, as in the fight-or-flight response. In order for a stimulus to be detected with high probability, its level must exceed the absolute threshold

The Carrot and Stick Approach of Motivation is a traditional motivation theory that asserts, in motivating people to elicit desired behavior. The Carrot and Stick approach of motivation is based on the principles of reinforcement and is given by a philosopher Jeremy Bentham, during the industrial revolution. This theory is derived from the old story of a donkey, the best way to move him is to put a carrot in front of him and jab him with a stick from behind. The carrot is a reward for moving while the stick is the punishment for not moving and hence making him move forcefully

reference: Encyclopædia Britannica      

image:stockphoto 2015

t-penned by iter-cursus
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